Twelve Grapes and Other Mexican New Year’s Superstitions

Mexican Superstitions for New Year

Farewell to the old year brings many Mexican superstitions, which give us hope for the better year to come.  Some of my favorite superstitions are eating twelve grapes after the clock marks midnight of the New Year’s Eve; taking your suitcase for a walk, and wearing yellow or red underwear, to bring prosperity or love.  I spoke about these superstitions with Capella Ixtapa’s Personal Assistant Saris Rosas, and she told me about some new ones I haven’t heard before.  If you’d like to bring some Mexican traditions into your New Year celebrations, here are just some of the things we like to do with the hope of an excellent new year:

Mexican Superstitions for New Year

1.  The twelve grapes of luck.  The tradition consists of eating a grape with each bell strike at midnight of December 31.  According to the tradition, that leads to a year of prosperity.

2.  Wear red or yellow underwear.  Red underwear is supposed to bring you lots of love in the new year, and yellow underwear lots of money.

3.  Make a wish list.  Before your New Year’s Eve dinner, write on a piece of paper three wishes for the New Year and fold the paper.  Make sure the paper touches your skin throughout the dinner, then when the New Year arrives burn the paper.  Your wishes will come true!

4.  Candles.  The candle colors attract different fortune: a blue candle is supposed to bring calmness in the new year, the yellow ones abundance, the red passion, and the green candles health.  Burn your selected color during your New Year’s Eve festivities.

5.  Take your suitcase for a walk.  If you want the New Year to be filled with travel then you must pack your suitcase and take it for a walk around your home.  When you return make sure you enter with your right foot for good luck.

These are just some of the superstitions and traditions with which we give a welcome to the New Year in Mexico.  The Capella Ixtapa December holiday program embraces several of the fun Mexican traditions – both for Christmas and New Year’s.  What are your New Year’s traditions?  I’d love to read about them in the comments below. 

Las Doce Uvas Y Otras Supersticiones Mexicanas Para Año Nuevo

Mexican Superstitions for New Year

Despedir el Año Viejo en México trae muchas supersticiones, las cuales nos dan esperanza de un año nuevo mejor.  Algunas de mis supersticiones favoritas son comer las doce uvas cuando el reloj marca la media noche del 31 de Diciembre; salir con tus maletas y dar la vuelta a la manzana, y utilizar ropa interior amarilla o roja, para atraer la prosperidad o el amor.  Hablé de estas supersticiones con Saris Rosas Asistente Personal de Capella Ixtapa, y ella me contó sobre algunas otras que nunca antes había escuchado.  Si estas buscando incorporar algunas tradiciones mexicanas a tu celebración de año nuevo, aquí están algunas de las cosas que nos gusta hacer para esperar un excelente año nuevo:

Mexican Superstitions for New Year

1.  Las 12 uvas de la suerte.  La tradición consiste en comer cada uva con cada campanada al dar las 12 de la noche de Diciembre 31.  Esto, de acuerdo a la tradición, nos garantizará un año de prosperidad.

2.  Utilizar ropa interior amarilla o roja.  La ropa interior roja supuestamente atraerá mucho amor en el año nuevo, y la amarilla abundancia económica

3.  Hacer una lista de deseos.  Antes de la cena de año nuevo, escribe en un papel 3 deseos para el año nuevo y dobla el papel.  Asegúrate que el papel toque tu piel durante la cena, cuando llegue el año nuevo, quema la hoja.  Tus deseos se harán realidad!

4.  Velas.  Dependiendo de su color, las velas atraen diferente fortuna: azul te traerá calma en el nuevo año, amarillas abundancia, el rojo pasión, y las verdes salud.  Utiliza el color de lo que desees para el Año Nuevo durante las fiestas de Noche Vieja.

5.  Lleva tus maletas a caminar.  Si quieres que tu nuevo año esté lleno de viajes entonces debes hacer las maletas y salir a darle la vuelta a la manzana.  Cuando regreses asegúrate de entrar a tu casa con el pie derecho para tener buena suerte en tus viajes.

Estas son tan solo algunas de las múltiples tradiciones y supersticiones con las cuales damos la bienvenida al año nuevo en México.  El programa de fiestas decembrinas de Capella Ixtapa festeja varias de las divertidas tradiciones – tanto para Navidad como para Año Nuevo.  Cuáles son tus tradiciones de Año Nuevo?  Me encantaría leer sobre ellas en los comentarios a este post.

 

New Year Celebrations in Mexico

grapes-fruits

New Year’s is upon us! The New Year celebrations in Mexico vary depending on the region, but in general, dinner with the family is the most common New Year’s Eve event.

This year we will celebrate at my home. We will start the evening by a late-night dinner. I am preparing traditional Mexican dishes including Bacalao (dried salted codfish), and Romeritos (patties of dried shrimp, sprigs of a wild plant known as ‘Romerito’ that resembles rosemary and potatoes served in a mole sauce).  We normally toast with apple cider (not Champagne as elsewhere), and my mother-in-law will prepare the fruit punch for the occasion.

At midnight we all shout “Feliz año nuevo!”  Followed by the grape tradition.  What is the “grape tradition?” During the tolling of the 12 bells announcing the hour, a grape is eaten at each of the 12 bell tolls.  The grapes represent a wish for the abundance for each month of the coming year. After this we embrace each other and say wishes for the upcoming year.

But that is just a sampling of our New Year’s traditions!  Two popular ones include:

  • If you want to have luck in love in the coming year, you need to wear red underwear on New Year’s Eve.
  • If you are looking for luck with money, make sure your underwear is yellow.

Not all of the traditions require you to wear special undergarments.  One of my favorite says, that if you want to travel during the new-year then you must take your luggage for a walk around the block!

After New Year’s Eve, we usually relax on January 1st and have lunch with other friends and relatives.

I would love to hear how you celebrate New Year’s Eve?

 

(En Español)