Auriga Detox Day At Capella Singapore

Detox Tips

With the Christmas season behind us, here in Singapore, the festive feasting continues with the Lunar New Year just around the corner.  During this time, Detox is the buzz of the town.

I had the wonderful opportunity to try out the Auriga spa Detox Day treatment which was something specially designed by Auriga spa to compliment The Organic Pharmacy’s 10-Day Detox Programme, a special kit that comes complete with tailored menus, recipes and activities to guide you through a 10-Day Detox ritual.

Detox Tips

While I was looking through The Organic Pharmacy’s 10-Day Detox Programme, I was thrilled to find a series of simple Detox tips to an effective detoxification process.  Here are a few of my favourite:

  • On waking each morning, drink glass of hot water with half a lemon squeezed in it.  The lemon provides nutrients to your body, which is quickly absorbed because there is no food yet in the body.  This practice also helps to break down the mucus in the body and alkalises the tissue.  Not to mention, the tangy zest from the lemon is a sure wake-me-up.
  • Ten minutes of breathing exercises, followed by another ten minutes of stretching is great for clearing and calming the mind as well as to get the blood circulating.  If you do not have much time, reduce the time to five minutes for each.  I felt so refreshed and rejuvenated after taking time off from my busy schedule to do this.  Stress is one of the biggest causes of the buildup of toxins in the body so this is the perfect preventive measure.
  • Before taking a shower, gently dry brush the skin to improve blood circulation and remove impurities on the skin.  I particularly love the soothing feeling of the dry bristles exfoliating the skin.
  • Shower and massage the body with body oils containing rosemary and grapefruit essential oils.  Besides its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, Rosemary has been known to boost the immune and circulatory system.  Meanwhile, grapefruit oil is not only a lymphatic stimulant, but also has anti-depressant properties- sure to keep you feeling positive.

If your New Year’s resolutions are of the wellness variety, these Detox tips are something to consider.  In fact, you can also pamper yourself and get detoxed in style at Capella Singapore’s Auriga spa with the Auriga Detox Day treatment.

Capella Singapore’s Foie Gras Terrine

Foie Gras Terrine

December is probably my favourite month in the year, simply because the air is just full of festivities and good cheer.

One of the things that I always look forward to is the scrumptious, mouthwatering Christmas meals.  Capella Singapore’s Executive Chef David Senia, was kind enough to share with me a recipe for a very festive appetizer which The Knolls will be serving this festive season – a Foie Gras Terrine with Apple Chutney and Brioche.

I love the simple preparation that impresses with its beautiful flavours.

Foie Gras Terrine

Terrine of Goose Liver, Vanilla Apple Chutney and Brioche Toast

Foie Gras Terrine

1kg  Foie Gras

10g  Salt

3g  Pepper

4g  Sugar

  • Marinate the Foie Gras with salt pepper and sugar and place it in a terrine
  • Put the terrine in a hot water bath and cook it at 55 degrees Celsius for an hour
  • Allow it to cool and set for one day
  • Remove the foie gras from the terrine and slice it evenly

Apple Chutney

500g  Sugar

1.5kg  Granny Smith apple (peeled and cored)

5pcs  Cardamom

5  Vanilla Pods

  • Dice the Granny Smith apple into fine pieces.
  • Combine all the ingredients, including the diced apples into a large saucepan and cook
  • Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring occasionally
  • Reduce the heat and continue allowing the mixture to simmer while stirring occasionally until most of the liquid has evaporated.
  • Remove from heat and allow it to cool.

Assembling the dish:

  • Place the sliced foie gras terrine in between two slices of toasted brioche and smear a generous helping of apple chutney across the plate.
  • To garnish, chop some nuts (hazelnuts, walnuts, almonds, pistachios) and gooseberries in a bowl toss it with vanilla olive oil

Additional festive garnishing tips from Chef David: you can add some micro herbs, such as coriander leaves, which not only add a decorative touch to the dish but also enhance the taste.

Bon Appétit!

Capella Singapore’s Peranakan Experience

Traditional Peranakan beading work.

Last week I had the opportunity to accompany one of the Capella Singapore Personal Assistants on a trip to the Peranakan museum as part of the new Peranakan Experience that we have created for guests who would like to explore the local Singapore culture.

Part of the tour took us to the Peranakan Museum, which showcased decades of age-old Peranakan culture and history.  For those unfamiliar, the Peranakan culture evolved from the early Chinese and Malay settlers in colonial Singapore and Malaysia who intermarried resulting in an exotic blend of cultures.

One thing I found particularly interesting was the strong matriarchal tendencies among the Peranakan.  While the men were the sole breadwinners for the family, the women, known as Nonyas, stayed home and ran the household.  As a result, one of the unique traits of Nonya women is that they are skilled in the culinary arts and crafts that distinguish the culture.  Luckily for me, I had the opportunity to experience both these luxuries.

Following our tour of the Peranakan Museum, we headed to a near by Peranakan restaurant.  The cuisine, while employing many traditional Chinese preparations, is extremely unique in its flavor profile.  We tried everything from a Fish Head Curry (not nearly as mad as the name suggests!) to Kueh Pie Tee, which featured shredded bamboo shoots and shrimp inside mini pie shells.  The flavors were exotic and bold and the dishes beautifully presented.

Traditional Peranakan beading work.

Traditional Peranakan beading work.

From there we headed to a shop run by a Peranakan woman, who still creates the traditional beaded shoes as well as selling beautiful kebayas.  Like the food the clothing was also brightly colored and rich in ornate detail.  We were told that some of the shoes could take several months to make as each bead was sewn on individually.  The same held true for the blouses and sarongs, as even the most “casual” kebaya was intricately decked out in skilled embroidery. Truly an art form!

The Peranakan culture is truly a significant part of the Singapore culture and something you really must experience for your self.  The next time you are at Capella Singapore be sure to ask your Personal Assistant for the Peranakan Experience.  I am sure you will love to learn about the history, culture and food just as much as I did!

Deepavali: A Festival Of Lights

Deepavali

Just recently, Singapore celebrated Deepavali, or Diwali as it is also known, one of the biggest and most important celebrations in the Hindu calendar.  Deepavali literally translated, means a row of lamps and it is observed by families traditionally lighting oil lamps to signify the triumph of good over evil.

Deepavali

For Hindus, Deepavali is typically celebrated over five days, with each day bearing a special significance. The festivities start with Dhanteras which also represents the beginning of the financial year for many Indian business communities. The second day of the festival is known as the Naraka Chaturdasi marking the vanquishing of the demon Naraka, a celebration of the triumph of good over evil.

Amavasya, which is the third day of Diwali, symbolizes the worship of Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth. Amavasya also tells the story of the Hindu Lord Vishnu, who vanquished the tyrant Bali, and banished him to hell. Bali was allowed to return to earth once a year, to light millions of lamps to dispel the darkness and ignorance, and spread the radiance of love and wisdom. The fourth day of Deepavali is known as Kartika Shudda Padyami is when Bali returns to earth to light the lamps. The fifth day is referred to as Yama Dvitiya, and on this day sisters invite their brothers to their homes for reunion.

In Singapore, Deepavali is a public holiday and the festivities are observed primarily by the Indian community, more specifically, the Tamils. It is typically marked by a vibrant lighting display along the streets of Little India in Serangoon Road which is the heart of the Indian community.

Apart from the light-up, Little India is all abuzz with a kaleidoscope of activities such as bazaars, exhibitions, parades and concerts. Here you can find a vast collection of traditional Indian artifacts, floral garlands and colourful Saris – the traditional Indian costumes which feature intricate brocade patterns and glittering gems. Traditional arts and crafts will also be on sale at the bazaars.

Like many Asian traditions and celebrations, the date for Deepavali is dependent on the phase of the moon. As such it is typically celebrated between the end of October and early November. If you are in Singapore during this period, you must remember to ask your Capella Singapore Personal Assistant for more information on the activities lined up for the Deepavali celebrations.

A Guide To The Best Food In Singapore

best food in Singapore Chili Crab

With Singapore Restaurant Week just around the corner, all the country is buzzing about the top restaurants to visit explore.  Staying true to its reputation as an epicure’s paradise, the Singapore Restaurant Week takes place twice a year.  Restaurants and eateries prepare special menus to showcase their cuisine and locals enjoy a week of hearty feasting.

This got me thinking of how Singaporeans truly love their food and will spare no expense to queue or travel for the best food in town.  Like it is often said, “when in Rome, do as the Roman’s do,” so when in Singapore there are just some dishes you must certainly not miss out.

best food in Singapore Chili Crab

The Best Food In Singapore:

1. Chicken Rice
Touted as the “national dish of Singapore,” Chicken Rice is one of my absolute favorite dishes.  Usually made with boiled or roasted chicken, the highlight of this dish is the aromatic “oily rice” that is made using chicken stock and fragrant Pandan leaves.

2. Chili Crab
Another favorite (for myself- and the rest of the Singaporean population!), Chili Crab features whole crabs stir-fried in a sweet and spicy red sauce.  Chili Crab is best eaten with a plate of Man Tou, a kind of Chinese bread, perfect for dipping into the mouth-watering chili sauce.

3. Laksa
For those who love spices, Laksa is a must-try!  With its Peranakan influences, Laksa is rich and savoury soup made with thick rice vermicelli boiled in a spicy coconut broth with dried shrimp.

4. Bak Kut Teh
Literally translated to “pork ribs and tea,” Bak Kut Teh is large slices of pork ribs boiled for hours in a clear peppery or herbal broth.  Traditionally this dish was served with a thick Chinese black tea meant to cleanse the body of the oil from the dish.

5. Satay
Asia’s version of a kebab, Satay is a barbecued skewer full of meat and is usually eaten with a rich peanut sauce and condiments such as onions and cucumber.  The defining feature of satay is the delectable aroma that it gives off when it is being barbecued.

Many of these local favourites, can be found at The Knolls restaurant here at Capella Singapore, make sure you try them during your next visit.  They truly are some of the best food in Singapore!

The History Of Mooncakes

Mooncakes 1

One of my favourite Chinese festivals, the Mid Autumn Festival happens each year on the 15th day of the 8th month of the Lunar Calendar. This year, the Mid Autumn Festival took place on the 19th of September. The festival is celebrated throughout Asia, wherever there is a large ethnically Chinese population.  And in each of these locations it has adopted additional names, one of the most popular here is Singapore is the Mooncake Festival.

Mooncakes 1

For those unfamiliar, Mooncakes are a small pastry, often round is shape, that contain a variety of filling ranging from lotus seed pastes to nut mixtures to salted egg yolks.  These days you can also find chocolate, ice cream and green tea versions.  During September almost every food outlet sells their own custom version, so the varietals are endless.  The outside of the pastry is then imprinted with different Chinese characters and imagery, each design unique to its purveyor.  It is common for people to give them as business gifts as well as to relatives.

An exciting historical account of how Mooncakes came about dates back to the Yuan Dynasty when the Mongolians ruled China.  The people of China baked Mooncakes and hid messages in them, which contained their battle plans against the Mongolians.  The success of this method led to the successful uprising of the Chinese to overthrow the Mongolian rulers and the Ming Dynasty was born.  It is said that Mooncakes are eaten every year to commemorate this inspired act.

The next time you are in Singapore in September, look out for when the Mid Autumn Festival takes place and you could be in for a cultural treat.  And don’t forget to ask your Capella Singapore Personal Assistant about their favourite Mooncake source- you may be in for a treat!